Cities unconvinced by Workman’s groundwater bill

Cities unconvinced by Workman’s groundwater bill

Though a bill has been filed by state Rep. Paul Workman (R-Austin) to create a groundwater conservation district in southwestern Travis County with the goal of monitoring and protecting the area’s supply of ground water, few stakeholders if any are satisfied with the shape and power of the proposed district . But the proposed Southwestern Travis County Groundwater Conservation District differs from the existing districts in some notable ways. While other groundwater districts provide for some exemptions for regulated wells,…

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Texas Tribune Q&A with HCA’s Katherine Romans

Texas Tribune Q&A with HCA’s Katherine Romans

HCA Executive Director, Katherine Romans, discusses water issues facing our region in this week’s Trib+Water Q&A. “The Hill Country is really a region of extremes, where it goes from serious droughts to catastrophic flooding in an incredibly short period of time. We’re also seeing increased population growth; it’s projected to double over the next 35 years or so. The biggest challenge is going to be keeping people aware of the limitations of water resources. It’s easy to engage the public…

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What is the Future of Water in Texas?

What is the Future of Water in Texas?

LISTEN: State Representative Lyle Larson from San Antonio joins Robert Puente, President and CEO of San Antonio Water System; Blair Calvert Fitzsimons, CEO of the Texas Agricultural Land Trust; and Meredith Miller, Senior Programs Coordinator for The Meadows Center for Water and the Environment to discuss the future of Texas water on TPR’s The Source. As the state legislative session rolls on, water is never far off the agenda. State Representative Lyle Larson from San Antonio says water will be his…

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Conference presentations from “Planning for Growth in Comal County”

Conference presentations from “Planning for Growth in Comal County”

Scientists, engineers, conservationist, and planners recently came together in New Braunfels for the two-day “Planning for Growth in Comal County” conference. The wide range of topics discussed included growth, public lands, watershed protection, and land conservation. Learn more about the conference here. View presentations from the conference here    

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Next stop for Texas-NM water dispute: Supreme Court

Next stop for Texas-NM water dispute: Supreme Court

Attorneys for the states of New Mexico and Texas learned yesterday that a lawsuit over the waters of the Rio Grande will head to the U.S. Supreme Court. For New Mexico, a lot is at stake. Though Texas also named Colorado in the suit, its real target is New Mexico. Texas alleges that by allowing farmers in southern New Mexico to pump groundwater connected to the river, the state is unfairly taking water from the Rio Grande that, under the 1938…

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Protecting the drops we drink: Who owns Texas water?

Protecting the drops we drink: Who owns Texas water?

This post from The Eagle, a Bryan-College Station paper, covers some of the fundamentals of water management and ownership in the state of Texas. As you can see, it gets complicated, fast. Even more complicated when you consider that all three types of water discussed-surface water, diffused surface water and groundwater-are actually connected in one water cycle. We couldn’t agree more with the author’s opening statement: “As Texas population continues to increase, so will demands for water. The answer to…

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EP Aquifer Test Approved

Aquifer tests are an essential part of the District’s permitting process.  The Board and staff rely heavily on results of these tests to inform permit volumes and conditions. In the spring, Electro Purification (EP) submitted a test well application to allow them to perform an aquifer test on three wells.  District staff worked with EP to design and plan an aquifer test that meets District guidelines.  The aquifer test will measure responses to abbreviated pumping simulations from the target pumping…

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The Edwards Aquifer: A Valuable Resource We Must Conserve

The Edwards Aquifer: A Valuable Resource We Must Conserve

The story of water and Texas starts right here, some 650 ft. below the surface where you are reading this. That’s the historic average for October of the J-17 well, 658 ft. above sea level, the measure that influences everything related to the Edwards Aquifer. The Edwards Aquifer is one of the most abundant artesian aquifers in the world. It supplies water to more than two million people and thousands of farmers in the region. Spread underneath Southwestern Texas, the Edwards Aquifer…

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Llano River plan gets nod from EPA

Llano River plan gets nod from EPA

Because the Upper Llano River is a healthy ecosystem, the Environmental Protection Agency has accepted a watershed protection plan that will help address future declines in water quality and stream flow, according to a news release. The plan was accepted as it met the agency’s national guidelines for watershed-based plans and effectively outlined a strategy to conserve and protect water quantity and quality in the watershed, according to plan developers. The Texas Water Resources Institute, part of the Texas A&M…

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Edwards Aquifer Authority has come a long way

Edwards Aquifer Authority has come a long way

The story of water and Texas starts here. San Antonio sits atop the Edwards Aquifer, one of the most abundant artesian aquifers in the world. It supplies water to more than 2 million people and thousands of farmers in the region. Spread underneath the land of South Central Texas, the Edwards charges the seven largest springs in the state and several major rivers, and is responsible for most of the state’s water fun. It is a miracle of our natural…

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